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Arrival Details

The Conference is just around the corner. We hope that all of you have made your travel arrangements. The Conference is taking place on a holiday weekend and the roads and ferries will be busy. Check out Getting to the Island and Getting to the University for detailed information.

Checking In

Everyone must check in before attending any classes or events.  When you arrive at the University of Victoria (UVic), proceed to Parking Lot 5. Do not unpack your car yet, just lock it and pay for parking. Volunteers will be available in the parking lot to help you purchase your parking. Follow the signs and proceed directly to the check-in desk in the Cadboro Commons Building.

Staying On-campus

After you have checked in, go to the University of Victoria Residence Services area where you will pick up your key and be shown your room. Please be advised that you cannot check-in with Residence Services before 3 pm. Residence Services will store you luggage until Residence check-in opens if you are arriving by air.

Parking

If you have a vehicle, it is very important that you familiarize yourself with the parking rules at the University.

Check-in Times

Pre-Conference Three Day Workshops registrants

  • Tuesday June 27 – 1:00 to 8:00 pm
  • Wednesday June 28th – 8:00 to 9:00 am

Conference registrants

  • Friday June 30th – 1:00 to 8:00 pm
  • Saturday – 8:00 to 9:00 am

A la Carte Registrants

  • As given above.
The Volunteer Badge Story

 

The ribbons attached to the ANWG 2017 conference volunteer badge are selvedges from the Pendleton Woolen Mills in Oregon. A thoughtful brother of one of our Victoria Handweavers and Spinners Guild members brought this back from his latest Pendleton shirt buying pilgrimage. The warp is cotton and weft is wool. The selvedges were produced from ITEMA R9500 rapier loom operating with a Staubli LX1600 Jacquard head. We thought that using this material to identify our volunteers was a great way to support the conference theme of “Treadle Lightly”.

 

Parking Suggestions

With a Stat Holiday and a Weekend occurring during our conference to complicate the matter, here are our tips and suggestions for onsite parking…

General Parking Information:

  • Those staying in the campus residences must park in Parking Lot 5 (see our maps for location). We will have volunteers on hand Tuesday, June 27 and Friday, June 30th to help with your parking.
  • For those not staying onsite, look at the location of your planned sessions/events and choose parking accordingly. Lots 5, 2, 6 & 1 may be the best options, but it completely depends on where you will be.
  • During the conference, parking is free on Saturday, Sunday and holiday Monday, July 1st to July 3rd (yes, even though Canada day is actually Saturday). Pay parking is in otherwise in effect Monday through Friday 24 hours a day.
  • Hourly, daily and weekly permits are available from parking dispensers in each lot. The dispensers accept Canadian 25¢, $1, and $2 coins, Visa, and MasterCard. They do not give change.
  • Costs double to park inside the ring road (lots with an alphabet designation) versus outside of it (lots with a number designation).

Here is a link to the University of Victoria Parking Map.

Here is a link to their Parking Information.

 

Parking Suggestions:

For Pre-conference Only workshop attendees (Arrive Tuesday June 27th – depart Saturday July 1st.)

  • You will need to pay for parking from your arrival on Tuesday to Friday at midnight. Saturday parking is free. The easiest choice is a weekly pass.

For Conference Only attendees (Arrive Friday June 30th – depart Monday July 3rd)

  • You will need to pay for your parking on Friday from your arrival to midnight. If you arrive before 3 pm, your cheapest and easiest choice is a daily parking pass. If you arrive after 3 pm, the easiest choice is still the daily pass.

For Pre-conference workshop & Conference attendees (Arrive Tuesday June 27th – depart Monday July 3rd)

  • You will need to pay for parking from your arrival on Tuesday to Friday at midnight. The easiest choice is a weekly pass.

 

 

Hints for the Dorm

Here are some hints to make your stay in the University of Victoria Dorms wonderful!

This info pertains mostly to the dorm rooms (single and double). Things may be slightly different in the apartments/clusters. While I base this information on my personal experiences staying in the UVic dorms during the summer and recent updates to their website, I apologize now if anything below is incorrect.

-Check in.  You will check in to residence (get your keys) at the Residence Services Building. You can see their location, and their proximity to Parking Lot 5 (where you need to park if staying in residence) on this map. Check-in to the residences starts at 3 pm. It is fairly unlikely you will have access to your room earlier than that. You can leave your bags in a secured area at Residence Services if you arrive early. But if you are travelling by car, we suggest you leave your luggage in your car until you check in.

 -Bring a pillow, a towel, and ALL your toiletries. The University dorms are clean, but sparse, accommodations. Do not expect fancy little toiletries or fluffy pillows. There is hand-soap in the bathrooms and basic linens are provided. The towels are fairly small. You may wish to bring your own fluffy pillow to supplement the thin one provided and an extra towel. (If you are flying to the conference, I’ve heard there is a limited supply of extra pillows and linens available through reception.)

 -Bring a hand towel. You will be sharing a bathroom with others on your floor, likely other conference attendees. To be kind and save time, you may want to bring an old hand (woven?) towel to leave in the bathroom. It is a drag to have to get your towel from your room each time, especially when you want to make a quick pit stop on the way to your next session. Don’t forget to collect your towel at the end of the conference.

 -Bring a lanyard for your keys. You will get keys on a small keychain to access your residence building and room. Your room door will lock behind you when you leave. A lanyard is useful, so that your keys are always with you. There is nothing worse than locking yourself out, in your nightie, after a midnight trip to the loo.

-Consider a small fan. Victoria has a lovely temperate climate. While the historical average high at the end of June is only 22’C (72’F), we do occasionally get really hot weather. And depending which way your room faces, it can really heat up. The residences do not have air conditioning. If the forecast is calling for hot, or you know you like it cooler, consider bringing a small fan for your room.

-Bring your tea bags. There is a kettle and microwave in the shared space on each floor. You may want to bring your favorite tea bags or instant coffee with you. There is not likely to be refrigeration or large quantities of ice available. If you want a cuppa without getting out of bed, you can also bring an electric kettle for your room.

-Communicate Easily. You will get the password for University WiFi. It is fairly fast and reliable. Get to know how to use Skype, or other apps, as a cheap way to communicate with home. You will also be emailed a daily newsletter during the conference, alerting you to the plans for the day, so bringing a device to check your email will be useful! (For those without easy access to email, we will have a few copies of the daily newsletter posted in our Meeting Place, Village Greens Room, in the Cadboro Commons Building)

 – Start with a good breakfast! In the Single/Double Dorms, you will get free breakfast vouchers when you check in to residence. The breakfast is a very generous, cafeteria-style buffet with hot and cold items. Cluster/apartment dwellers can get information about their breakfast options when they check-in.

Read the Rules. You can read the rules for your stay in residence on the UVic website: http://www.uvic.ca/residence/visitors/terms/index.php

(Photos of a Single Dorm Room. Taken summer 2016)

 

 

Can your Shuttle Race?

Can your Shuttle Race? 

 Enter the ANWG Shuttle Race and find out!

 

Give a new life to an old or damaged weaving shuttle. Add some wheels, decorate it, and bring it to the conference.

On July 2, at 4:45pm, you can see if your shuttle has what it takes to be crowned champion. Or aim to win the prize for Best Dressed Shuttle. Cost to enter is $2 cash, which will go toward the event prizes.

Look for a Sign up sheet in the conference hospitality room Thursday-Saturday.

Here is a blog post from the Schacht Spindle Company to give you some ideas about how to transform a shuttle into a racer: https://schachtspindle.com/schacht-bbq-and-shuttle-race/

We cannot wait to see what you come up with!

 

Rules:

-Your racing shuttle must have been a ‘real’ weaving shuttle prior to its transformation

-Your racing shuttle should have wheels, so that it will move down a decline ramp to the finish line

-You need to be at the track, located near Cadboro commons (where the banquet will be held) on July 2 from 4:40-5:00pm to race your shuttle

-This is a fun event. The judge’s decision about which shuttle wins is non-negotiable.

-No performance enhancing drugs or professional athletes, please!

 

 

 

Lace up your shoes…

Lace up your shoes… Only 65 days until the conference begins!

“Huh, what?” you might be asking. It may seem a little premature to lace your shoes for the conference, but I assure you, a little lace tightening now may prove very useful at the event.

The planning committee is thrilled to host the conference on the beautiful University of Victoria campus. The setting is beyond gorgeous, the facilities clean and modern, and the food bountiful and varied. But there will be the need to stroll between your residence room, sessions, meals, and special events located at different places on campus. You will definitely be logging a couple of kilometers (miles for you Americans) during your time with us.

Rest assured that no marathons will be required. We have worked to ensure your onsite travel will, for the most part, take place within a pie-slice of the entire campus. The ground is flat, nicely paved, and clearly lit at night. The campus is very accessible, you won’t need to do stairs unless you choose them over the elevator up to your dorm room (Note: a few of the shorter dorm buildings don’t have elevators, please let UVic housing know if easy accessibility is a requirement for your onsite accommodation)

But we can all use a reminder that walking is a great way to stay in shape. So throw one of your gorgeous scarves around your neck, lace up your sneakers, and take a walk outdoors. A tiny boost in your fitness now may make your conference experience even more enjoyable.

If you have significant concerns about your ability to walk between activities at the conference, please contact us at info@anwgconference2017.com We will do our best to assist you to meet your needs.

Happy walking!

 

 

‘Whale’ you are here…

Orca photo from SpringTide Whale Watching & Eco Tours

Another of the many activities to do in Victoria for both conference registrants and their families is whale watching.

SpringTide Whale Watching & Eco Tours in Victoria have offered all ANWG 2017 Northwest Weavers’ Conference registrants and their families a $30 CAD discount on the cost of a whale-watching tour just by mentioning the ANWG 2017 conference when they reserve directly with SpringTide, either by telephone, on their website, via email, or by dropping in to see them at 1119 Wharf Street.

SpringTide is a family owned and operated business successfully operating in Victoria, BC for more than 24 years.  They are conveniently located on Victoria’s beautiful Inner Harbour and are just minutes’ walk from the heart of downtown.

Attendees do not have to reserve in large numbers to receive this discount, it is valid for each individual all season long (April to Oct), just be sure to mention promo code “ANWG2017” when reserving!

You can find out more about SpringTide Whale Watching & Eco Tours on their website:

www.victoriawhalewatching.com

Or you can reach them by phone at: 250. 384.4444  or  1.800.470.3474

Fashion Show Submission deadline extended to April 21

The deadline to submit entry forms for the Fashion Show has been extended to April 21, 2017.  

 

A La Carte Registration is open until April 16

If you do not plan to attend the conference, but would like to attend the Fashion Show, the Banquet, or the Keynote Address, or take a single class, seminar or workshop, you may now use the A La Carte options below (subject to availability). A La Carte Registration is open to both ANWG and non-ANWG members. Due to University of Victoria policy, we are unable to sell ANY tickets to the Fashion Show, the Banquet, or the Keynote Address during the conference. All tickets must be purchased in advance through the  A La Carte Registration process.

A La Carte Menu

Access A La Carte Registration

 

Registration closed on March 31, 2017 11:59 PM PDT.

If you are not registering for the entire conference, but would like to attend the Fashion Show, Banquet, Keynote Address, or take a single class or seminar, or a workshop your booking window for A La Carte choices is April 1 at midnight PDT until April 16 at 11:59 pm PDT.

If you haven’t registered yet, there are still many incredible sessions with open spots. You can see what is still open on our website for the Pre-Conference and the Conference.

Featured Workshops

We are honoured to host a variety of talented instructors at our conference. Why not try something new? Here are a selection of Pre-Conference Workshops that still have a place for you:

Polly Adams Sutton – Lidded Cedar Bark Pagoda
For those of you who love basketry, Polly Adams Sutton is offering a 3-day workshop titled Lidded Cedar Bark Pagoda with the end product being the cutest basket I have ever seen.

Polly works with Western Red Cedar she harvests herself from the forests around her home and prepares for her own and her students’ use. She is interested in the sculptural forms she can create with cedar bark.

Michele Boyd – Spinning Superior Socks
If you love knitting socks, Michele Boyd’s 3-day beginner workshop–Spinning Superior Socks–still has some spaces available. Michele has asked us to let you know that she is happy to accommodate any type of wheel— double drive, Scotch tension, and bobbin-led. So sign up, pack up your wheel and come to the conference.

Karen Selk – Silk Fusion
Karen Selk, textile designer and artist, original owner of TreenWay Silk and longtime weaving instructor, is looking forward to introducing you to a new medium—Silk Fusion. This unique technique uses a medium to bond silk fibers into a lustrous kind of “felt” which can be gossamer and transparent or thick and opaque as leather. Silk fusion is a perfect canvas for hand or machine stitching, printing, stamping, origami, quilting, jewellery, wearable art, book coverings, and collage. Participants will make numerous samples and then be provided with patterns for hats, bags, and boxes.

Dianne Totten –Crimp and Create
Learn how to weave fabric that that is permanently pleated even when washed; and those pleats can form a design of their own. Not only can you use this fabric to make an entire garment, you can use “crimp cloth” to replace knitted ribbing for a sweater or to add a knit look to the collar area of a jacket. This is an on-loom workshop using a variation of woven shibori for both warp and weft. Participants will draft, weave, and crimp their samples in class to discover the endless possibilities.

Gaye Vallance – Ancient Fibers: Eco-Yarns
Gayle uses colour and texture to create unique yarns, making the best use of dyes and fibres, as well as spinning, weaving, braiding and felting techniques. The characteristics of bast fibres–flax, bamboo bast, hemp, and ramie–will be discussed. Instruction will focus on spinning, finishing, and dyeing bast yarns for weaving. Bast fabric swatches will be dyed, printed, and discharged to further show the diverse possibilities of these fibres. Complex yarn structures will create cables, cords, and ropes suitable for garment embellishment and for strengthening straps, handles, and loops on purses and bags. Jewellery will be constructed to highlight the character of the complex bast yarns

 

Banner Banter!

Oh, y a w n, it’s three years away…..

No worries, it’s two years away……

Yikes, what? Six months away?   Time to boogey!

And that’s just what members of the Greater Vancouver Weavers and Spinners Guild and the Victoria Handweavers and Spinners Guild are doing.

A visit to the Metchosin studio of Wendy Mitchell is an exciting entry into the world of felting and Wendy is fond of felting in a BIG way. Though she takes felting quite seriously she, at the same time, has a riotously good time as she demonstrates the prep on one of the felted batts that will become a banner for the ANWG 2017 Conference in Victoria, B.C. She’s keeping the actual design of the banner under wraps until the Conference but we are observing the initial steps and we marvel at the power of the Felter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, across the pond in Vancouver, Toby Smith and Rosie Kerschbaumer are designing a woven banner using the Conference colours with a bit of a 3-D effect (thank you, Theo Moorman) for the logo (“if all goes well” Rosie states).

 

The weavers, spinner, felters and dyers around here are getting excited about ANWG Conference 2017 and look forward to seeing everyone in June/July. Banners will be flying!

 

-Post by Prairie Escallier

Volunteers Needed

The countdown to the ANWG 2017 Northwest Weavers’ Conference has begun and we predict an action-packed event.  There will be a lot to do before opening day and also during the conference.  We’ll be needing some helping hands. Volunteering is a way to become more involved, to learn new skills, and to meet and make new friends.

If you have some free time (even an hour) during the conference (June 28 to July 2, 2017) and would like to help, you can check the box on your online Registration form (opens January 17, 2017).   Or contact our Committee Chair for Volunteers at volunteers@anwgconference2017.com

Some of the jobs we need volunteers for:

  • Hospitality desk
  • Seminar and workshop aides
  • Fashion show assistants
  • Display assistants
  • Provide security in the galleries
  • People’s choice ballot counters

 

The Beautiful University of Victoria Grounds

The University of Victoria is easy to navigate around. It is accessed by several entrance points going into a circular road called Ring Rd. Once you are on Ring Rd, it is two lanes going one way. If you pass your destination or miss the turn off you can keep on the road and you will circle around to your destination again. There are several maps on UVICs’ website.

There are several places to visit on the grounds, as you have time.
Finnerty Gardens is located off Cedar Hill X Rd. It is a peaceful area with walking paths and benches to sit when you want to relax. There are many flowering shrubs and larger trees around for shade. At the edge of this garden is an Interfaith Chapel. Mystic Vale and South Woods are located close by the Gardens. This is a larger area of walking trails.
There is also the Petch Fountain and Grassy Quad located in the centre of the campus behind the Library building. This is a great place to just sit and soak in the sun.

The book store is located in the Campus Security Building next to the McKinnon
Gymnasium. Check out this website for more information and hours. The Student Union Building is also close by. It contains food services. There is a patio and outside seating at Village Greens in the Cadbury Commons Building. This area will be the meeting place for those who want to socialize with others and spend time spinning and /or networking.   Mystic Market is a large food mall located in the University Centre. It offers gluten free and vegan options. There is a small convenience store located close by for toiletries etc.

You may want to take a very short drive down Sinclair Rd. to a lovely beach called Cadboro Bay Beach . There are logs to sit on and admire the great view out to Haro Straits.

Post by Kathy Ready

Change to Rebecca Mezoff’s schedule
Due to circumstances beyond our control, the full-day class with Rebecca Mezoff–The Mobile Tapestry Weaver: Weaving Tapestry on a Hokett Loom—will take place on Saturday July 1st only. In addition, Rebecca Mezoff’s half-day seminar–Ergonomics for Fibre Artists—will take place on Sunday July 2nd in the morning and again on Sunday July 2nd in the afternoon.
Instructor Q&A: Kim McKenna

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference

I will be teaching a class on nature dyeing protein fibres.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

This class will take the mystery out of nature dyeing and open the door to the astounding world of colour possible from nature. Attendees will leave with a better understanding of the dyeing process including: mordanting, how to achieve a nice even colour run (if that is what they prefer), best practices to achieve colours that are as light and wash fast as possible, and how to maintain the “hand” of the yarn (keep it from becoming scratchy).

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Being able to learn from and share with others who are passionate about all things textile and fibre.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

My iPad so I can take photos and notes as well as to store email addresses.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Take advantage of every activity you can and don’t hesitate to introduce yourself to the person standing next to you.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

These days I am obsessed with Fair Isle and Aran knitting traditions and have been experimenting with spinning and plying techniques that create a better yarn for these fabrics.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

Loom: Right now I am weaving silk yardage from yarns I dyed with Symplocos, gallnut and indigo. Wheel: I have just finished spinning, knitting and then dyeing a thick, cushy wrap with a cable that meanders along its edge.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

When I was a teen I bought a handwoven mohair scarf in an artisanal gift shop. I had seen old handwoven rugs and blankets at friends’ homes but had no idea that anyone still carried on the craft. When we moved to BC in the late 70’s I discovered a guild close to my home. I started taking weaving lessons with an amazing weaver and wonderful teacher, Barby Paulus, a few years later and thus began my journey.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

Something to do with rocks and gems or metal.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

Loom: I have two looms but the Cherryville is my favorite. When not in use, it can be taken apart very easily and then put away. We have decided to downsize and will be moving into a smaller space soon. I plan to put the loom up when I have a project and store it away when I am working on other things.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I started working seriously with nature dyeing 6 years ago. When I first experimented with them over 30 years ago I did not like the results either I, or others were getting with them. When I returned to them 6 years ago I was hooked. The difference? Applying the knowledge I gained from 30 years of working with protein fibres and synthetic dyes to the nature dyeing process.

You can learn more about Kim and her work at the following link: 

www.claddaghfibrearts.com

photo provided by

photo provided by Kim McKenna

Instructor Q&A: Rebecca Mezoff

 

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I’m teaching a workshop about color use in tapestry called Predicting the Unpredictable: Color in Tapestry. I’m also teaching a full day seminar about weaving tapestry on Hokett looms. I’ll also give a half-day seminar about staying healthy while practicing your art or craft discipline called Creating Without Pain: Ergonomics for Fiber Artists.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

The most important thing is to leave inspired to create. I’ll teach a lot about tapestry weaving, color use, ergonomic tips, and the fun of weaving tapestry on little looms, but I want all my students to go home feeling inspired to make things.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

The energy. I love meeting new people and catching up with colleagues. Every conference day is one where I’m learning from the people around me including the students in my workshops.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

If they are held on a college campus, a reading light. Maybe it is my dad’s fault as he was an ophthalmologist and was always insisting we had good light to read, but I travel with my own light. Dorms never have good ones and the hotel ballrooms have horrible light for working. Bring on the light!

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Bring your own reading/work light. No, just kidding. Come with an open mind and heart. Keep your eyes open for the things that light you up and pay attention when that happens. That might be the thing you are supposed to do.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

I have been weaving tiny things on little looms. I am generally a large format tapestry weaver. The bigger the piece, the better. But lately, I’ve fallen in love with my little looms again. I love the immediacy of them and have realized that I don’t pressure myself at all with those pieces. They are play-based therapy in a way!

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

A big commission for a client’s home in Dallas.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I started weaving in about 1998 because someone sent me an old barn loom that was in horrible condition. I eventually bought a better loom and after weaving a lot of baby blankets and then lace weaves, I started learning doubleweave and attempted to make pictures (which is totally possible in doubleweave, I just didn’t know it). I quickly realized that the weave structure I should be studying was tapestry. I moved home to New Mexico in 2004 to learn and haven’t stopped since.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

If I wasn’t a full-time tapestry weaver, I’d either be a spinner/yarn designer or I’d go into textile restoration.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

My Harrisville rug loom is the very best loom ever made for tapestry. Of this I am convinced. It has both a warp extender and a worm gear. Those two pieces of equipment mean that my warps are as tight as I want them and the tension is perfectly even throughout the entire piece.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

When I was a kid I imagined that the fuzzy green acrylic bath mat in my bathroom was a magic carpet and I could explore the world by flying it wherever I wanted to go. Now, as an adult being a bit more realistic, I just walk. Long-distance hiking is my secret passion.

You can learn more about Rebecca and her work at the following links: 

Website: www.rebeccamezoff.com

Blog: www.rebeccamezoff.com/blog

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RebeccaMezoffTapestry/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamezofftapestry/

 

photo provided by Rebecca Mezoff

photo provided by Rebecca Mezoff


 

Instructor Q&A: Shirley Berlin

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I’m teaching “Braided Wire Necklace” and “Braids with Cores”.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

Attendees will take away samples, paperwork, and hopefully, heads buzzing with ideas. Probably an almost completed project.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

The general creative buzz and meals eaten with like-minded people. You just never know who you’ll end up sitting with.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

I always remember to bring an open mind and a big suitcase.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Be relaxed. You’ll meet a few people who know less than you do and also a few who know way more than you will ever know. You will laugh with and be encouraged by all of them.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

I am a braider and never fail to be amazed by the possibilities: endless patterns, beads and wire, for starters.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

On my marudai? a flat braid to take to a big upcoming show to prove to doubters that you can make a flat or square braid on a round disc. You don’t need to buy different discs for different braids. (end of small rant!)

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I have been weaving and braiding since the world was young. I took City & Guilds in the 80’s and met Rodrick Owen, newly back from Japan.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

If I didn’t weave or spin or braid, I would sit on my sofa and eat chocolates, maybe reading ChickLit or watching daytime TV. I would sorely miss my Fibre Friends, and travel would loose some spice.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

The best thing about a marudai is the gentle sound of wooden bobbins touching each other as braiding goes on.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

It is inspiring to think about very old textiles and how today we are just more hands – both continuing traditions and inventing new ones.

You can learn more about Shirley and her work at the following link: 

www.shirleyberlin.com

 


Instructor Q&A: Terri Bibby

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I will be teaching SAORI Weaving, a wonderful philosophy from Japan that encourages exploration in weaving and self-discovery.  I will be bringing SAORI looms for people to weave on.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

The SAORI philosophy and shining eyes!

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

The gathering of like-minded people exploring fibre and possibilities.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

A camera.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Wear something you have made – it is a great conversation starter.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

Weaving three-dimensional pieces on a two-harness loom – it is so unexpected to weave something that looks flat on the loom and when it comes off the loom to be able to open it up into three dimensions.  Oh and cashmere…

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

My SAORI loom has a cashmere warp on it right now.  When I was in Japan in April I wove a piece with cashmere for the first time and have fallen in love with it – so soft and light.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I started SAORI weaving 11 years ago when I saw someone with a SAORI loom at a Fibre Festival, that moment changed my weaving direction and my life.  Prior to that I had been doing traditional weaving for over 20 years.  I started weaving when I couldn’t get into the quilting class because it was full.  I never looked back and still haven’t tried quilting.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

It would have to be fibre-related – that has been part of my life since my grandmother first taught me to knit and crochet at 13.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

My looms now are all SAORI looms.  I love the ease of warping these looms – it means that I do more weaving.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

Misao Jo, the founder of SAORI Weaving, just celebrated her 103rd birthday in April.

You can learn more about Terri and her work at the following links: 

FB – www.facebook.com/saorisaltspring
Instagram – www.instagram.com/saorisaltspring
Web – www.saorisaltspring.com

photo provided by Terri Bibby

photo provided by Terri Bibby


Instructor Q&A: Linda Kubik

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

Tailoring Handwoven Fabric.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

Students will learn sewing and tailoring techniques suitable for handwoven fabric.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

My favorite part is seeing old friends.

4- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Be open to everyone and anything.

5- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

My current interest is traditional screen printing to create yardage on either commercial or handwoven fabric.

6- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

I just finished weaving my once a year towel yardage.

7- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I estimate I’m close to weaving 5000 yards of fabric.

photo provided by Linda Kubik

photo provided by Linda Kubik


 

 

Instructor Q&A: Dianne Totten

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I will be teaching “Crimp and Create,” a 3-day workshop dedicated to learning the thought process behind creating crimp cloth. Participants will draft, weave, and crimp their samples in class to discover the endless possibilities.  Tips for weaving yardage and
using the cloth will be included.  It is a wonderful technique for those who enjoy creating garments but don’t like the hassle of fitting.

During my one-day studio class, “Crimp Cloth – One Day In Depth,” students will experience both warp and weft crimp through lecture, visual presentation, and a hands-on activity that will show both the similarities and the differences between warp and weft crimp.

The 3-hour session, “Crimp Cloth Primer,” is an opportunity to see what crimp cloth is all about.  An overview of warp and weft crimp will be discussed through the use of a PowerPoint presentation. An introduction to drafting crimp cloth will conclude the session.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

I hope attendees will be excited to go home and explore the endless possibilities of this wonderful fabric that I call crimp cloth and discover for themselves what fun I have had for almost 10 years making this magic cloth!

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

My favorite part of a weaving conference is the energy in the air from all who share the love of fiber. Meeting new people and hearing their fiber stories is inspiring.  It usually takes me about 3 days to ‘come down out of the clouds’ after a conference.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

I always bring my passion for weaving with me. (And chocolate!)

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Get plenty of sleep before you come!  Make a list of all you want to do and see, listing the days/times/locations for each.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

After taking a session on Lampas from Alice Schlein at Complex Weavers, I am fascinated by the structure – or combination of structures – that can be used.  Next step for me is to see if I can successfully crimp it.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

I have a wool warp beamed for a wool crimped vest with a cable-like design.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

My first loom was a Christmas gift from my husband 40 years ago.  I was a “workshop junkie” for many years.  A workshop with Catharine Ellis launched me on the path of exploring variations of woven shibori.  The result is what I call crimp cloth.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

Something fiber-related, but I can’t think of anything I’d rather do than weaving.  I am giving watercolor painting a try and enjoying the experience/challenge.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I have an AVL Compu-dobby that I use most of the time.  I like the abundance of treadle options available using a computer.  I am no longer treadle-impaired.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I love sharing everything I have learned during the development of crimp cloth.  Although garments are my specialty, I am amazed at the endless possibilities that reach beyond garments.  So many ideas, so little time!

You can learn more about Dianne and her work at the following links: 

Website:  www.diannetottenhandwovens@comcast.net
Facebook:  Dianne Totten Handwovens

photo provided by Dianne Totten

photo provided by Dianne Totten


 

Instructor Q&A: Margaret Coe

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I will be co-presenting, with Bob Keates, “Laptop & Looms” a 3-day pre-conference workshop on Fiberworks focusing on a creative digital approach to weave design.  During the conference I will present two half-day seminars “It’s a Wrap” on both weaving and professional pursuits surrounding wrap weaving; and “Double Weave, Divided and Conquered” covering, time permitted, layer exchange; tied; deflected; parallel threadings; along with structure and thread variations.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

Our hope is that new, contemporary approaches to design will open participants eyes to new possibilities in their own work.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting old friends, making new ones. (And the Vendor Hall.)

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

Computer.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Stay on campus or wherever the activity is.  So much sharing goes on in hallways, lounges, and late night sessions.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

Pairing new threadings with liftplans used to create entirely different structures and just seeing what happens!  Sometimes it’s a complete failure, but sometimes it’s magic.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

Tester for an effect that we’re exploring; two baby wraps.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

Handweaving has only been for 37 years, but I worked in a mill, and grew up in a weaving town with a burler and mender for a mother.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

Draw / Paint.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

AVL 40S A-Series — the most significant feature I would miss is the live tension system – that and the auto advance.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I have found that someone or someones that push me to exceed – the best form of competition is competition between equals who egg me on to pursue that which I have not previously pursued.  And vice versa of course.  Paul O’Connor did that, and now Marian Stubenitsky and Amy Norris and too many others to list.

You can learn more about Margaret and her work at the following link: 

website: www.e-weaving.com; FB page: https://www.facebook.com/eWeaveDesign/

photo provided by Margaret Coe

photo provided by Margaret Coe


Instructor Q&A: Alison Irwin

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I have been asked to present two 1-day seminars: Handsome Hand Towels and Bias Weave ‘Basket’ Case.  The first session is an introduction to mock satin damask, a broken twill pickup technique on 4-shafts.  Setting up the loom is very easy, it’s a one-colour warp threaded to a straight twill (1.2.3.4).  In the second session, students will learn how the name tags each conference participant will receive were woven from strips of paper.  These flat ‘baskets’ make great gift card holders!

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

That I love to do samples…and have more of them than actual finished projects!

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Any conference is an opportunity to be inspired by the handwork on display in the juried shows and in the garments and accessories worn by attendees.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

My handouts. 🙂 

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Stay on campus so you can meet more of the delegates.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

In the summer of 2016 I attended the Braids conference held in Tacoma and took a class on Sámi bands from Susan Foulkes who lives in England .  We used a special double slotted rigid heddle and a backstrap loom.  I teach a similar weaving technique on an inkle loom.  Since returning home, I’ve been filling in squares on graph paper with ideas for new patterns for Sámi-inspired bands; most of them will be woven on an inkle loom or small table loom.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

On one of my inkle looms is a band in 5/2 mercerized cotton.  On my 8-shaft table loom is a mock satin damask runner in Bambu.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I was given a small rigid heddle loom (made by the Spears company) when I was about 8 years old.  In my late teens I took a night school class on weaving and used a small Salish-style loom built by my father.  Both looms are still with me.  Forty years ago I bought my first 4-shaft loom, a 45″ Glimakra counterbalance, after taking a class with Lilly Bohlin of the Weaver’s Loft in Victoria, BC.  That large floor loom has since been replaced by a trio of smaller Louet looms.  The most recent addition to the studio is an old metal Structo loom.  I also have a handful of inkle looms built for me by my husband.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

I’d probably play more with Kumihimo, designing patterns on a special grid for both the basic kongo gumi braid and its beaded version.  That play could lead to a colouring book for braiders.  I’d also continue to experiment in Adobe Photoshop by cutting equilateral triangles out of my photographs in order to create quilt-like designs inspired by Stack-n-Whack®  and One-Block Wonders.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

My smaller floor loom is ‘one of a kind’.  It began life as the Louet W70 and was owned by one of the Tzouhalem (Duncan) Guild’s original members.  I already had a W70 and bought the second one thinking it might be used by students taking lessons from me.  However it sat gathering dust in my downtown studio for several months because people preferred to use the more portable Dorothy looms that could go home with them.  While looking at that second W70 one day I decided it would be more useful AND much easier to move in and out of the studio if it was made narrower, about the width of a Dorothy.  That modified W70 is now my ‘go to’ loom if I am taking a workshop.  Doorways are a breeze to go through, I can sit on my favourite stool to weave on it AND the loom has treadles!

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I enjoy walking and try to get out most mornings before breakfast.  My usual route takes me down to the beach in Maple Bay and my small camera is always slung over my shoulder.

The photo below is one of Alison’s projects.  ‘All the King’s Men’, is a chess set that combines both the mock satin damask and bias weave basket techniques.

If desired, Alison can be contacted by email: 

alison at cow hyphen net dot com

photo provided by Alison Irwin

photo provided by Alison Irwin


 

Instructor Q&A: Janet Dawson

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I’ll be teaching three classes aimed at the no-longer-novice weaver who’s looking to stretch her wings. The first is Painless Back to Front Warping, which will help folks get past the obstacle of dressing their looms quickly and on to the good stuff. The second is Beyond the Basics: Planning Your Own Projects, which will help folks who are ready to move beyond projects printed in magazines or books build confidence in their own design decisions. The third is Pick Up Artist, which is all about embellishing plain weave with fast and fun pickup and related techniques; this class is aimed at rigid heddle looms, but the techniques apply to plain weave on any loom.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

Confidence. My goal is to teach the hows and whys so that weavers are empowered to make decisions for themselves without stress or angst.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting new people, and being inspired by everything I see them doing. I’m even more inspired by my students’ enthusiasm and excitement when the lightbulbs go on than I am by seeing what advanced weavers are doing – though that’s pretty amazing, too!

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

My camera and my favourite brass threading hook.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Do all the things! Don’t be intimidated by topics or techniques that are more advanced than you are now. I firmly believe that you’ve got to hear and see things several times before they stick – even if you’re overwhelmed and confused in a session, you’re laying the groundwork for future understanding.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

Block weaves. That isn’t one structure, but I’m focused on the class of weaves more than any individual structure that makes it up. Though I usually concentrate on multishaft unit weaves, lately miniature Overshot has caught my eye.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

An 8S two block turned twill colour gamp and an 8S six block huck twill sampler. My big loom is between warps.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I learned to weave in 1994 when I moved to Cape Breton and signed up for a class to meet like minded fibre people. I’d never been particularly interested in weaving before that, but I was on too tight a budget to pay $50 for a knitting class when I already knew how to knit. 😉 Once I sat down at the loom and discovered that weaving is really just maths cleverly disguised as string, I knew I’d found my place in life.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

I’d knit and spin. If I couldn’t do any kind of fiber arts, I’d focus on computers or math or something to do with languages. Writing, perhaps. Definitely some form of teaching.

10- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I teach the online Floor Loom Weaving course on Craftsy.com, which has almost 6000 students, so I’ve got a lot of experience in smoothing the way for new and not-quite-new weavers. Teaching weaving is my favourite thing ever. As with math, the technical side of weaving can be daunting or intimidating for lots of people but it really doesn’t need to be – what those folks need is a teacher who can explain things clearly and give them the tools to feel confident in their own abilities and understanding.

You can learn more about Janet and her work at the following links: 

www.thebobbintree.com is my Facebook page. www.weaverspalette.com is my teaching website. http://www.craftsy.com/ext/floorloom is my Craftsy class.

photo provided by Janet Dawson.

photo provided by Janet Dawson.


Instructor Q&A: Gayle Vallance

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I will be teaching a 3-day workshop:  Ancient Fibres: Eco-Yarns. I will also be teaching 3 half-day seminars:  Best of Bast, Super Designer Mohair, and Cabling: Opening the Door to Designer Yarns.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

An appreciation of natural fibres such as bast and mohair.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting other fibre enthusiasts and sharing skills and information.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

The willingness to be surprised and impressed by the skills of others, and a willingness to share my own skills.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Be prepared to open your mind to new ideas. Don’t be shy about asking for advice or information.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

Bast fibres are amongst the  most eco-friendly of plant fibres, but are not popular amongst spinners.  I fear that they will become less available and much more expensive if we don’t start using them more.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

Woollen blankets and scarves woven in Dornick twill.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I have been spinning/weaving since 1976.  I learned to spin to use the wool from my flock of sheep.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

I have a large garden.  I work as a volunteer with a number of non- profit groups.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I have a lendrum wheel.  I love its ease of use and flexibility for spinning a wide range of fibres and yarns.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

Each of us needs an outlet for our creativity.  Spinning and weaving can provide that outlet.

photo provided by Gayle Vallance.

photo provided by Gayle Vallance


 

Instructor Q&A: Diana Twiss

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I’ll be teaching two half-day sessions and one full-day session. The half-day sessions are: Knitting with Handspun Yarn and Spindling 1.0: Let’s Make Yarn! The full-day session is a spinning class called Wild About Colour. It’s all about managing and exploiting colour in yarn we make from those lovely dyed braids we see all over the place.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference? 

Hopefully they will take away a sense of confidence in the spinning and knitting decisions they make. I am really guided by this quote from Judith MacKenzie, “There is no right or wrong way to spin, but like everything else, spinning is governed by cause and effect: if you do this, that will happen. When you understand the forces at work in your yarn, you can choose (and even modify) any of the basic spinning methods to get exactly the yarn you want from the fiber you choose.”

Judith MacKenzie, The Intentional Spinner: A holistic approach to making yarn. Interweave Press: Loveland, CO. 2009.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

I’m having a lot of fun these days playing with colour. I just completed three spinning experiments using the same colourway – blog posts on these experiments are pending. And I am also doing a lot of experimenting with the colour work of dyer Kylan Rivers of Kinfolk Yarn and Fibre. I’ll be using her dyed fibres in my Wild About Colour class.

My experiments go beyond working with colour and learning how to manage colour, it also includes adding texture so you can exaggerate the colour. Take my class, Wild About Colour and you’ll see what I’m talking about.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

Nothing is on my wheel right now, but there are several colourways in the spinning queue. I have a plan to do ombre singles of three different colourways and then make a three-ply yarn with them. I’ve identified two of the colourways I want to use, but haven’t settled on number three yet.


8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I came to spinning by way of being a knitter and a person heavily influenced the “Little House on the Prairie” books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. The homesteading spirit and the concept of self-sufficiency were things that excited me and motivated me to try it myself. I started knitting and crocheting at a young age, knit through high school, university, and married life. Living out here in the countryside, I didn’t like the yarn I found at the shops – not a lot of natural fibres, and when I found 100% wool it was either expensive, sometimes scratchy, and oftentimes the wrong colour. One day I saw a small notice about the Langley Weavers and Spinners Guild in the community paper. I called and had a great chat with the guild President learned about modern day guilds. I thought I needed to be a proficient spinner to be part of the guild. But this guild, and many of the modern ones, is a teaching guild. Their mission is to pass the craft along and teach people the craft, and in this case, how to spin and weave. I attended the next month (January 2000), joined the guild, bought a second-hand Ashford Traditional, a brand new set of hand carders, a raw fleece and the rest is history.

At that time I was busy with three young children, a full-time job, a large newly renovated homestead site with gardens and chickens. I didn’t have time or extra money to take workshops or pay for lessons, so I am mostly self-taught. There wasn’t a lot happening online in fibre arts in 2000, so most of my reference came from books and magazines (Spin-Off) that I borrowed from the guild library.
9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

I’d go mad. But seriously, at heart, I am a teacher. I work full-time as an adult literacy educator for a provincial literacy organization. I studied Fine Art and History at university and art education at teacher’s college. I have an absolute need to do creative things like draw, paint, knit, and spin. For the last decade I’ve been working to bring these two elements of my life together by teaching fibre arts, especially spindle spinning.

When you decide to learn a “lost art” you have to carve out your own learning path, be attentive to your learning style and preferences, and find your own mentors and teachers. Yes, there are courses you can take to become a Master Spinner, but for those who just want to make yarn, we don’t want that route. We simply want to make yarn so we can make things, so we can satisfy an important part of our being. We make a mistake and do damage to ourselves when we treat our creative pursuits and desires to make things a mere hobby and superficial entertainment. I learned that nurturing my creative soul was not just a “nice thing to do” but it was an essential thing for me to do. It helped to settle an anxious part of my being.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I have two Ashford spinning wheels, the Traditional and the Joy. I love them both for different reasons, but especially like the fact that the bobbins are interchangeable. But the spinning tools that really excite me these days are my spindles, especially my Turkish spindles. They have caused me to really slow down my spinning, and because some of them are heavier than what I normally spin with, I’m getting slightly heavier and bouncier yarns. Like changing whorls on our wheels, when we choose different spindles we can get more or less twist for our efforts.

Plain and simple, I love the yarn I make on my spindles. It has a better angle of twist and a more consistent look and feel than the yarn I make on my wheel. I have a wide assortment of them, so the variety of yarns that I make as a result of the differing weights and styles delights me.

When you spin on a spindle, you have to be right in the moment. You have the twist between your fingers and then before you wind on, you have the chance to run your hand along the yarn. When I do this I can tell if the yarn needs more or less twist. I can’t do that with my wheel. When I spin on my wheel I can easily get into a zone from the gentle repetition and lose track of what I am doing – and thus make default yarn. I find it easier to be an intentional spinner on my spindles than on my wheel. And it shows in the yarn.

You can learn more about Diana and her work at the following links: 

Blog: 100milewear.com

Ravelry: dianajeantwiss

Instagram: DianaTwiss

Facebook: Diana Flurey Twiss and 100-Mile Wear (page)

photo provided by Diana Twiss.

photo provided by Diana Twiss


 

Instructor Q&A: Marilyn Robert

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I’ll be teaching a 3-day workshop, Ikat Weaving, and a 1-day class, Chinese Sewing Kit.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

Participants will feel a sense of accomplishment, that they have tackled a challenging weaving / dyeing project, with historical depth and contemporary design possibilities.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting people.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

Coffee, and a camera.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Stay well-rested.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

I am excited by collapse weave techniques and fibers. The shaping and sculptural possibilities are intriguing.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

A simple Monk’s Belt piece which will be cut into pieces for perpetual calendars.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I have been weaving for 45 years. When I was pregnant with my first child, a friend who was a weaver dressed her loom and taught me to weave a baby carrier. I was hooked.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

I would concentrate on making books, with my handprinted papers.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I have an 8 shaft Fireside loom which I bought in 1973 I think. It’s like one of the family.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I am an advocate of natural dyeing, and a member of the Natural Dye and Ethnic Textile study group in the Eugene Weavers’ Guild. (You can see an article and video about her interest in natural dyes here. )

You can learn more about Marilyn and her work at the following link: 

www.marilynrobert.com

 


 

Instructor Q&A: Karla Mather-Cocks

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

Spinning Serendipity & Weaving with Atypical and Recycled Fibres

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

A chance to explore without any rules!

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting new people and learning new things.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

Scissors!

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Save some room in your luggage to build up your stash.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now?

Spinning rag yarns.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

A Bauhaus inspired tea towel warp and a core spun yarn.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

Over 10 years. The local guild and Olds College!

9- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I love my louet Victoria. I can bring it anywhere and spin anything on it.

You can learn more about Karla and her work at the following link: 

https://www.facebook.com/mogopomo

@mo_go_po_mo (twitter & Instagram)

kittyblack (twitter & Instagram)

 

 

photo provided by Karla Mather-Cocks.

photo provided by Karla Mather-Cocks


 

Instructor Q&A: Marilyn Moore

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I’ll be teaching a three day workshop: Wire as Fiber: An Integration of Technique and Inspiration. In this workshop students will be using their own creativity and ideas as they learn new techniques and explore wire and wire cloth and the tools used, as it relates to what they wish to accomplish. I’ll also be teaching two seminars, one three hours twining with wire to make a pair of earrings, and a six hour knitting and crocheting with wire to make the sea urchin pendant.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

My hope is that students will come away with some new skills and an appreciation of what can be accomplished with wire.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

I love weaving conferences for all of the inspiring work and the sense of sharing that is in evidence with the participants. The students as well as the instructors add so much to the whole atmosphere. I always come home with ideas and inspiration to carry on with my own work.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

The one thing that I try to bring to a weaving conference is an open mind. You never know where that inspiration will come from.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

For someone coming to a conference for the first time, just remember to see and experience as much of it as you can. Stay open to the experience and enjoy your time with other weavers.

6- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I have been a weaver, spinner and basket maker since 1978. I no longer have a loom, I sold my last one two years ago, I now work exclusively with wire. The colors, texture, and luster of the material is what really attracts me. I also love to twine, knit and crochet all hand working techniques, thus keeping my work small  and intricate.

You can learn more about Marilyn and her work at the following link: 

www.marilynmooreswired.net

photo provided by Marilyn Moore.

photo provided by Marilyn Moore


Instructor Q&A: Louise Smith

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

3 half-day seminars- Learn about Linen, Don’t Despair: Fix that Error, and All you ever wanted to know about the GCW Master Weaver tests

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

From all my seminars, they will have useful information that they can use at home right away, with written notes plus whatever they add to those notes.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

I love the Fashion show, and then looking at the garments afterwards and taking pictures of them.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

Comfortable Shoes, my Camera.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Look closely at all the weaving displays and get inspired to participate yourself, in the next one. We were all first time attendees sometime.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

I am into many areas of interest as you can tell from my answers. I have to physically change what I am doing quite often, due to muscle problems, so I work on many things at the same time, working 1/2 hour here and then 1/2 hour elsewhere, etc.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

I am spinning Ramie at the moment. Weaving a Wool blanket on my Woolhouse Gertrude 58″, 16 S Countermarche loom, a 3 end block weave weft laced wool rug on a linen warp on my 45″ LeClerc Fanny II Loom and fine Linen napkins with a gold metallic accent with a double faced twill on my Macomber 40″ loom.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

Since 1990. I was off work with fibromyalgia and a friend said “you have sheep, you have to learn to spin”. And then the group was short a weaver for an exchange so they said “you can do it”, and they mentored me though a 13 yd warp and a 12 tea towel exchange.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

I use to do more sewing, and more knitting and more pleasure reading.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I love my Macomber 10 shaft, 40″, front hinge treadle, Jack loom. The front hinge treadles make the loom very light to treadle and the Jack tie-up is very easy to use. As one gets older one has to think about the ease of treadling and your knees, hips, etc. This loom has quite a small footprint even though it weaves 40″ widths.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I presently work part-time and I am planning to retire by end of April 2017 so that I can devote more time to weaving, spinning and presenting more workshops. I have benefitted from other weavers knowledge and what they shared with me, so now I feel I can help others with their weaving enjoyment through education.

You can learn more about Louise and her work at the following link: 

Listing on the BC Tourism

photo provided by Louise Smith.

photo provided by Louise Smith

Instructor Q&A: Linda Davis

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

“The Magic of Bateman Tied Weaves” (workshop) and “The Magic of
Bateman Weaves” (seminar).

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

An understanding of what Bateman weaves are and interest and enthusiasm for
further exploration.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Learning and sharing.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

My camera.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

The amount of information can be overwhelming. If you can leave with just
one new good idea to put into practice, it can be a successful conference.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

Bateman weaves! They were a mystery to me for many years and I was
intimidated by the bland monographs. With six years now as the Complex
Weavers Bateman Study Group chair, and doing lots of Bateman weaving, my
eyes have been opened to the wonders of these weave structures and their
possibilities.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

A Bateman Park weave.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

Over 40 years. I went a weaving and yarn shop in Boise, ID that blew my
socks off and knew this was what I had to do! The rest is history.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

Other fiber arts like quilting and knitting, which I also do along with
weaving. I also write.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I have had a Louet David for several years. I recently retrofitted it with
the sliding beater and love it. I can now do more open weaves without having
my shuttle fly away!

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

I recently self-published a biographical fiction novel that is offered on
Amazon. It has nothing to do with weaving!

You can learn more about Linda and her work at the following link: 

http://handwovencreations.com/

 

photo provided by Linda Davis.

photo provided by Linda Davis.


 

Instructor Q&A: Karen Selk

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I will be teaching Silk Fusion.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

The knowledge and confidence to go home and produce exciting work in their own studios.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting new and old friends and seeing the excitement of the workshop participants creating some amazing things.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

A smile and open heart.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Come with an open heart.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

Nature printing with natural dyes.  It is just so exciting to obtain colour from nature.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

I am working on a series of leaf prints for a show.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I started my textile journey in 1970.  A friend in university returned from an archeological dig in Central America and showed me a backstop loom.  She took me to the arboretum where we got some sticks and made a backstop loom for me.  That was the beginning of the most exciting journey that has led me throughout the world in search of silk and natural dyes and their makers.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

Not sure, but it would be something creative – maybe painting.

10- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

We have a large food garden which provides us with most of our veggies, grains and fruits for the whole year.  It is as creative as fibre work, with the inclusion of colour, texture and technical knowledge to provide delicious food for the body and beauty for the soul.

11- Where can people learn more about your work?

I live on an island and belong to Island Textile Artists.  We are a group of creative, supportive women.  Our website is:  www.islandtextileartists.ca

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photo provided by Karen Selk


Instructor Q&A: Carol James

1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?

I will be teaching sprang and finger weaving.

2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?

I want attendees to take away the idea that they can indeed create textiles anywhere, in the car, on the bus, in a waiting room.

3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?

Meeting other weavers.

4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?

Chocolate for emergencies.

5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?

Wear something that you can engage other weavers in conversation.

6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?

I have been caught by the sprang technique. It is incredibly adaptable, can be loose & lacy or tight & windproof, can be used to create all manner of garments, from hats to socks to vests to leggings. Some research suggests that Medieval vertical-striped leggings were made using the sprang technique.

7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?

On my sprang frame right now is a multi-colored vest.

8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?

I learned to crochet and embroider at 4 yrs of age. I started spinning/weaving in 1990. We moved to Winnipeg, and I needed to make warm clothes.

9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?

Get into trouble.

10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?

I have a PVC pipe sprang frame. It goes with me everywhere. It is easily adjustable to a variety of sizes, comes apart and fits into my suitcase.

11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?

Finger weaving does not have to mean sashes. It can mean neck scarfs, or belts, or bags.

You can learn more about Carol and her work at the following links: 

www.SashWeaver.com

And watch her YouTube Videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtBME0YFrLk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY3jyy2rGEs

Photo provided by Carol James

Photo provided by Carol James


Instructor Q&A: Laura Fry
1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?
 I will be presenting two seminars:  Magic in the Water and A Good Yarn
2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?
Magic in the Water is an over view of the importance of wet finishing once the web has been cut from the loom and hints and tips about how to do it. A Good Yarn discusses fibre characteristics and why it is important to know this in order to choose a good yarn for a project.
3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?
Connecting with other weavers and putting faces to names seen only on the internet.  🙂
4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?
An open mind.  I always learn something I didn’t know before if I just keep an open mind.
5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?
Ask questions.  Weavers are generally the most sharing of people and always happy to help newer weavers learn more about this complex craft.
6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?
I have just signed up for a workshop that will look at designing drafts using weaving software and things like networked drafts.  I am looking for something to expand my thinking on designing drafts and this seemed like a good way to delve into it.
7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?
For spinning I’m mostly making yarn for knitting.  I’m using some hand dyed roving (Falklands) to make a textured yarn which will get plyed with a very fine wool/nylon I got from Pendleton Woolen Mills far too long ago!  The AVL has a 100 yard warp on to weave panels for the next ANWG conference in Prince George in 2019.
8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?
I started in 1975 as a career choice.  I have documented my beginning on my blog http://laurasloom.blogspot.com in the very first posts I did in 2008.
9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?
I will always do something related to textiles.  I started knitting at the age of 5, then moved to embroidery, then sewing my own clothes.  If I couldn’t weave I would probably at least carry on spinning and knitting.
10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?
I have two primary looms – the AVL and a Leclerc Fanny.  The AVL has 16 shafts, computer assist and all the bells and whistles.  I love making fancy twills and lace.  When I’m weaving something narrower or ‘simpler’, or want to make multiple stripes, those warps generally go onto the Leclerc.
11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?
For the past few years I have been honoured to be included in the teaching roster for the Olds College Master Weaving program.  This program presents the principles of weaving, not just the how to.  It is fantastic to see people begin to understand how the craft works and become as excited about it as I am.
You can learn more about Laura and her work at the following link: 
 http://laurasloom.blogspot.com   or find her on Facebook as Laura Holzworth Fry

 

photo provided by Laura Fry

photo provided by Laura Fry


 

Instructor Q&A: Sarah Jackson
1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?
Three workshops: Color Confidence, The First Cut is the Deepest, and Sample is Not a Four-letter Word!
2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?
Greater confidence in themselves as weavers and designers.
3- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?
Bring an open mind and a sense of adventure.
4- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?
Color is what I love most about weaving. Why? It challenges, intrigues, and inspires me.
5- What is on your loom/wheel right now?
Towels in turned taquette–great opportunity for exploring color interaction.
6- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?
 My 4-shaft loom belonged to an elderly weaver who was forced to give up weaving for health reasons. She gave me her favorite shuttle which fits my hand perfectly and her name is still visible on a few of her bobbins. Knowing my loom was cherished by someone who loved weaving as much as I do magnifies my joy as a weaver.
7- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?
 I love to hula hoop!
You can learn more about Sarah and her work at the following link: 
photo provided by Sarah Jackson

photo provided by Sarah Jackson


Tiaras Optional

The ANWG Planning Committee has come up with a novel way to be identified during the Conference in 2017:  the fourteen of us will be channeling our inner diva and donning hand-woven sashes.

Here is a sneak peek of the process:

The box of yarn in Conference Colours arrives.

unnamed

Wound down and divided up to distribute to the seven weavers who will weave two sashes each.

wound-down

On the loom and ready to weave.

otl

Weaving the borders.

borders

No self-respecting sash is complete without fringes!

fringeAnd here is the teaser—you will have to wait until the Conference to see the completed sash.

teaser

 

Post and Photos by Sharon Broadley.


 

Make your 2017 ANWG Conference Part of a Family Holiday

“Will you have information about what to see and do in Victoria?” “I’m bringing my husband/friend to the conference. Can we stay in the University Residence?” “Can I bring my child?” “What about my cat/dog?” These are all questions the planning committee has been asked. Here is some information that should assist in answering these questions:

Where to Stay

University of Victoria Student Residences offer accommodation to tourists in the summer months so everyone coming to the conference can bring family or friends. You will also be able to extend your stay beyond the conference and take some time to look around Victoria and Vancouver Island.

The university offers both traditional dorm rooms and cluster housing. The dorm rooms have one or two single beds and shared washrooms and lounges. Cluster housing offers four single bedrooms per unit, with a shared kitchen and washrooms. Cluster housing is ideal for families and groups–children are welcome.

Clear instructions about options for accommodation at the university residence will be posted to the website in the months to come.

The Accommodation pages on the Conference website will also grow to include links to hotels and motels in Victoria. The university does not allow pets, so we will have a link to pet-friendly hotels.

For those who desire to bring an RV or tent, there are several campsites in the region. The university does not allow overnight camping onsite. Look for a link to camping options on the website soon..

What To Do

Whether you are a history buff, a hiker or cyclist or a urban shopper, the first place to look for information about Victoria is the Tourism Victoria website.There are links here to the top tourist attractions around Victoria: Butchart Gardens, Craigdarroch Castle, Butterfly Gardens, Whale watching, Fort Rodd Hill, the Parliament Buildings, Point Ellice House, and Shaw Centre for the Salish Sea to name a few. The Royal BC Museum is a great place to learn about the history of Victoria and BC and the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria has an excellent collection of Asian Art.

Victoria is known as the “City of Gardens” for good reason—because of our mild year-round climate, many Victorians like to garden. You can get a feel for our garden city by walking or cycling around the city. Victoria has hundreds of kilometres of bicycle paths, bike lanes and bike routes in the city, including the Galloping Goose Regional Trail and the Lochside Trail.

Afternoon tea is a tradition in Victoria. You can enjoy it at several venues in Victoria including the Fairmont Empress Hotel, the White Heather Tearoom, Butchart Gardens and the Abkhazie Gardens.

There are beaches and hiking trails both in and around Victoria. Spend a morning walking or cycling the Victoria seafront from downtown to Oak Bay. Wander around Beacon Hill Park in the centre of the city or drive out to Thetis Lake Regional Park or East Sooke Regional Park for some west coast walking. Cadboro Beach is a 15-minute walk from the University and Willows Beach is a short drive or bus ride.

Victoria is home to many fabulous restaurants. The downtown core is exceptionally tourist and pedestrian friendly and fresh local offerings abound. From 5-star dining to fresh fish and chips on the dock, there is something for every palate. And you can wash it down with locally made beers, ciders, wines and spirits. Take some time for a tasting at a local pub or winery or take a wine/beer tour.

Victoria is a great place to experience many physical activities, whether it be a world-class game of golf, a kayak trip around the bay, or reeling in the big one. Many links to local activities and tour operators can be found at the Tourism Victoria site or by searching the Internet.

And the Victoria region is only the gateway to what Vancouver Island has to share. Travel companions may wish to travel north while you weave/spin with us or consider an adventure together before or after the conference. The towns of Duncan and Nanaimo offer activities galore. The west side of the island, including the town of Tofino, is perfect for beachcombing and surfing. And further north, even more natural beauty awaits.

Finally, Canada will celebrate its 150th birthday during our conference, on July 1st 2017. As Victoria is the provincial capital, you can expect major celebrations throughout the city. There will be free concerts and activities during the day and a stellar fireworks show over the inner harbor that evening.

The conference website will have links to these activities and more under Companion Activities beginning in early September.

Spectacular Spinning in Vicotria's Inner Harbour

Spectacular Spinning in Victoria’s Inner Harbour

Post by Christine Purse.

Instructor Q&A: Velma Bolyard
1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?
 I will be teaching shifu.
2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference? 
Any one coming into my class will leave with whatever they open their mind and heart to learn. You will probably get tired of me swooning about fiber and paper and, er, artists’ books! And the kindness of plants.
3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?
I’m an open book here, I’ve only been to a few, the last one was in the 80’s. I think the markets and the gallery shows are really exciting.
4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?
Notebook and pencil.
5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?
Come with an open mind and be ready to experiment, make samples and notes, and not finish stuff.
6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?
Milkweed fiber for paper and thread is much on my mind this year, also dogbane. I have Canada thistledown pulp soaking right now. I want to explore milkweed more thoroughly.
7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?
Kami-ito made from lokta, woven on the ‘stump loom” with four selvedges.
8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?
I studied textile design in college, BS Design, textiles. Before that, when I was (maybe) four years old my mother Elva Weaver Bolyard taught me to sew on tissues with re-purposed hem threads. I had to stitch well on that before I was given scrap fabric to sew. My mom made, among other things, men’s winter coats, but she never used the term tailor. She just sewed them up. Did you notice her birth name?
9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead? 
Be a potter.
10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?
I love my Lout S10, first generation from the 70’s or very early 80’s. I love how it can be schlepped around and always runs like a well-designed tool ought to.
11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?
I am newly retired from teaching special education students, I’m a specialist in working with emotionally disturbed teens. Look out!
You can learn more about Velma and her work at this link:
Photo provided by Velma Bolyard

Photo provided by Velma Bolyard


Instructor Q&A: Bryan Whitehead
1- What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?
I will be teaching a class on making Japanese Bamboo reeds and giving a workshop on Japanese indigo and Katazome.
2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?
They will take away the actual reed they make and some knowledge of how Japanese traditionally used bamboo for reed making. In the katazome workshop they will take a tsunami of background information on the traditional technique and an actual piece of katazome dyed indigo they will dye themselves.
3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?
Meeting up with like-minded people.
4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?
An iPad of pictures of your work to share.
5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their first weaving conference?
agh…nothing off the top of my head. Maybe wear something you made.
6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?
Weaving hand-spun silk on a back-strap loom.
7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?
On my big Finnish Loom: A silk/wool blend heavy blanket dyed various shades of dark browns, greens and aubergines from different combinations of indigo and madder. On the backstrap loom: Handspun silk from cocoons I raised myself and dyed with indigo I grew myself. A few flecks of green where I over-dyed with gardenia pod yellow.
8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?
When I first  moved to Japan I bought a small table loom and started weaving rag weave. I watched Margaret Mattice weave in Campbell River 40 years ago and thought she was the cat’s pyjamas.
9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?
Play guitar more and perhaps draw more.
10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?
 My first Japanese  loom showed up at the house 20 years ago. It is still here, an old 19th century Japanese ‘takabata’. An elderly woman from a neighbouring village taught me to weave on it. It is too small for me and rickety. But it is the essence of Japanese folk textile looms. I have three of them in the house right now. Students and friends are using them.
11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?
The student behind me in the picture below is 98 this week She started studying indigo with me when she was 85. It is never too late to start something new.
You can learn more about Bryan and his work at the following link: 
"The student behind me is 98 this week She started studying indigo with me when she was 85. It is never too late to start something new. " - photo from Bryan Whitehead

“The student behind me is 98 this week She started studying indigo with me when she was 85. It is never too late to start something new. ” – photo provided by Bryan Whitehead


Instructor Q&A: John Mullarkey
1-What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?
Primarily tablet weaving but also some Pin Loom weaving.
2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?
Hopefully they will see just how passionate one can be about small looms.  And how beauty can come from such small weavings.
 3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?
 I’d have to say the incredible fertile creativity.  There is nothing more inspiring to create than being around that many other creative people.
 4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?
Dorky, but my handwoven lanyard for my name badge.
5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their  first weaving conference?
Do not hide!  That’s what I tried to do my first conference, and thankfully wasn’t allowed to.  I was adopted by weavers from my area, and they are still my best fiber friends.
6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?
I was recently at a braiding conference and am really inspired to pull out the Maurudai and give that a go again.
7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?
Bands bands bands!  I have two looms warped with different projects, but they are mostly samples for classes.
 8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?
Spinning for 14 years, weaving for 12.  Bought a spinning wheel, and where there are wheels there are looms.  I have had great fun riding that slippery fiber slope downhill at breakneck speeds.
9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?
I would still create.  Definitely.  Seems to be an imperative.  I’m actually exploring glass blowing right now.
10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?
I bought an incredibly sturdy hand made floor inkle loom at a conference once.  The base is big enough to rest my feet on.  I love it!  It is almost a piece of furniture it is so sturdily built.
11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?
I just sold my floor loom.  So now I am proudly committed to band weaving, and only band weaving!  Well, I do still have a rigid heddle loom, oh, and there are the pin looms, and almost forgot about the table top 8H loom.
You can learn more about John and his work at the following links: 
"handwoven shoe laces, because I can!" Photo from John Mullarkey

“Handwoven shoe laces, because I can!” Photo provided by John Mullarkey


Instructor Q&A: Robyn Spady
Editor’s Note: This is the first Q&A interview with our conference instructors. These will hopefully assist you in deciding what workshops and seminars are of interest to you. More will be posted in the months leading up to registration. But be warned, our instructors are so talented and passionate about their work that you may find yourself wanting to take them all!

1-What will you be teaching at the ANWG 2017 Conference?
  • Pictures, Piles, Potpourri, & Perplexing Curiosities
  • Trimmings without a Turkey
  • Jewelry from Thrums
  • Putting Together a Novelty Act
  • Four Shafts Aren’t Complex?  Au Contraire!
2- What is one thing that attendees will take away from your session(s) at the conference?
Empowering inspiration – In other words, learning something, knowing how you did it, and leave with the ability to do something new on your own
 3- What is your favourite part of weaving conferences?
My favorite part of a weaving conference is watching participants that have learned something new sharing with others their new knowledge and skill.
 4- What is one thing you never forget to bring to weaving conferences?
A small notebook to write down ideas, inspiration, names and email addresses, etc.
5- What is one piece of advice you have for someone coming to their  first weaving conference?
Embrace the unknown and the unfamiliar.  A weaving conference will provide the opportunity for participants to step outside of their comfort zone.  At times it will be ominous and may feel overwhelming.  Mistakes will be made.  Just remember it’s all part of the journey and learning process.
6- What one weaving/spinning technique, structure, fibre has caught your interest right now? Why?
Novelty yarns.  I find it amazing how one strand of something remarkable can transform a fabric from ordinary to extraordinary.
7- What is on your loom/wheel right now?
A warp for the next issue of Heddlecraft.
 8- How long have you been weaving/spinning? How did you start?
I learned to weave in 1969 on a four-shaft floor at summer camp, Camp Namanu outside of Portland, OR.
9- If you didn’t weave/spin what would you do instead?
Sew
10- Tell us about one of your looms/wheels. What is one feature you love about it?
My favorite loom is my four-shaft counterbalance loom made by the Payton Loom Company.  It originally belonged to my great-grandmother and she wove my baby blanket on it.  I don’t remember her, but I love the idea of weaving on her loom.
11- What other interesting fact would you like to share with conference attendees?
You can never predict everything you will see, experience, learn, etc. at a conference.
You can learn more about Robyn and her work at the following links: 

www.spadystudios.com – weaving website that includes classes, schedule, and more

www.heddlecraft.com – Heddlecraft magazine’s website

Photo provided by Robyn Spady

Photo provided by Robyn Spady


 

Tea Towel Exchange

All conference attendees are invited to participate in a tea towel exchange at the 2017 ANWG conference.

Keeping with the ‘treadle lightly’ theme, we suggest you use up your partial cones rather than purchasing new materials for weaving the towel. A towel of many colours perhaps?

Two Easy Steps to Participate:

  1. Bring your handwoven towel to the registration desk at the conference.
  2.  Pick up an exchange towel in the Meeting Place on the last day of the conference.

We are looking forward to seeing a colourful display of tea towels in the Meeting Place from June 28th to July 2nd!

The ANWG 2017 Conference Planning Team would like to thank the Deep Cove Weavers and Spinners for their coordination of this fabulous part of the conference.

sb_threeonawire


 

What’s Green About: Wool?

Wool is renewable, recyclable, and biodegradable. The process of growing a fleece actually sequesters carbon from the atmosphere. Wool takes dye easily and dyes easily with natural dyes. Sheep graze grasslands and do not need extensive equipment to keep them healthy and to produce strong, healthy fleeces. What’s not to like?

Like everything else, there is a downside to wool. Stories circulate in the news about sheep being abused—generally during shearing time. The most recent is an interview with Carol Sunday of Sunday Knits who talks briefly about her efforts to ethically source merino wool. As in any industry, there are always those who cut corners to increase their profit margin and both animals and workers can take the brunt of this.

We also need to be aware of how the wool is processed; scouring and dyeing processes can both introduce pollutants to our water supply.

So take the time to ask your supplier where the wool you are buying comes from and how it is processed. Buy roving and yarn from companies who care about doing what is best for all of us–people, animals and the environment. Don’t choose your fibre only on the basis of cost. Ask yourself why the fibre or yarn is so cheap—which particular corner was cut so you could have a bargain. Unless we let our suppliers know we care, they will not necessarily care either.

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Victoria Spinners demonstrate their skill

post by Christine Purse


 

 

Our Logo Inspired Inkle Band: Weave One Today!
Logo Inspired Inkle Band. Designed and woven by Alison Irwin

Logo Inspired Inkle Band. Designed and woven by Alison Irwin

When you look at the logo for ‘Treadle Lightly’, the 2017 ANWG Conference in Victoria, what do you see? I initially interpreted its bold bars as lamms and the lighter ones as treadles under a loom. And then I saw…The Fish. Now what ran through my mind was this thought: “For a gathering that will take place on an island, including a beautifully simple marine motif in its brand is such a brilliant idea!”

It’s also a very weavable image, especially for someone who loves pickup.

What you see in the photograph is an inkle band I’ve woven in 5/2 mercerized cotton. Its design features several stylized ‘gold fish’ surrounded by small diamonds. Those ‘gold fish’ are my take on the conference logo, and this technique is one of my favourite ways to manipulate the warp on a 2-shaft loom. By either dropping down or picking up one or more of the pattern threads – in this project they’re the gold threads or ‘dots’ on the blue background, I’m able to create more complex patterns while weaving the two basic sheds (H and O) of the band.

When a dot is dropped, and I do this before passing the weft through the shed, that warp thread is replaced by a small weft float. Because my weft is the same colour as the background threads, patterns made up of weft floats on this band appear dark. The three diamonds at the beginning of the band (in the picture look just above the fringe on the right) are examples of DROP DOWNS.

What do those diamonds look like on the reverse side of the cloth? The opposite of a weft float on the top is a warp float on the bottom. When the band is turned over, that trio of blue diamonds is transformed into a set of three gold ones, like the ones on the lower left in the photograph.

The ‘gold fish’ are all PICK UPS, so each dot in that design becomes a warp float that straddles at least three and in some places five rows. As the band is being woven, each of these bold images in the gold threads is a dominant part of the band.   On the flip side, what was a ‘gold fish’ is now a set of blue lines in a sea of dots, its warp floats now weft floats.

One way to create the warp floats is to first weave that row (i.e. H) as usual. Before changing to the next shed, use a pick up stick, such as a small knitting needle, to lift those dots that will be carried over the next row. When that next row (i.e. O) is woven, the picked up threads become part of its upper shed. Change the shed again (i.e. H) and the picked up threads rejoin their original warp group.

In summary, drop down pattern dots before weaving the row and pick up pattern dots after weaving the row.

If you’d like to try your hand at weaving this version of the logo, refer to the diagram of the first part of my band. It incorporates both drop downs and pick ups.

The basic brick-like grid was downloaded from www.incompetech.com and I added the pattern dots using Adobe Photoshop Elements. You could do this manually with a pencil on a printed copy of the grid. I chose to work with dark dots on a light ground, the opposite of the actual band, so I wouldn’t have to fill in as many of the rectangles that represent the warp threads. Not shown in the artwork are the striped borders of my band. When planning your warp, do remember to include extra threads for your borders.

As you work your way up from the bottom of the diagram, you’ll notice that numbers have been added to some of the threads; these are the dots that will be manipulated. The count is from the right simply because I am right-handed. A number on a light rectangle represents the weft float that will appear when that thread is dropped out of the warp group that has been raised. Numbers on the dark vertical bars indicate which threads should be picked up to form warp floats. Some bars are marked with an asterisk*. Those are the warp threads that will straddle five rows.

Enjoy weaving these drop downs and pick ups. Once you’ve mastered The Fish, do play with other patterns. You may also wish to experiment with a weft in a colour that doesn’t match either the pattern dots or the background threads. It will add another design element to your project; just keep in mind that it will show along the selvedges of the woven band.

A PDF draft for the Conference Logo Inspired Inkle Loom Band can be found by clicking this link: inkle loom logo

post and project by Alison Irwin.

Alison can be reached at   alison at cow-net dot com   if you have any questions about the technique.


 

Market Hall in 2013 Market Hall Vendors

Both conference attendees and the general public will be welcomed into a large Market Hall at the conference. The Market Hall will be located in the large McKinnon Gymnasium at the University of Victoria. In addition to guild booths and displays, there will be numerous fabulous vendors from all over the region.

There are already 15 vendors committed to come and more have expressed interest. Currently booked are Jane Stafford Textiles, Kalabandar: Scarves, Sew Kool Buttons, The Weavers Atellier, Inca Dinca Do, Sanjo Silk, Morrison Creek Alpacas, Knotty by Nature Fibre Arts, Riverstone Yarns, Unwind Knit and Fibre, West Coast Colour and Carding, Vegan Yarn, Maiwa Handprints Ltd., Leola’s Studio, and Chaotic Fibres.

If you know of a vendor who would be a wonderful addition to our Market Hall, please let them know we still have some space available. If they wish to be part of the fun, they can get more information and apply through our website: www.anwgconference2017.com/invitation-to-vendors/

In the coming months we will be adding full descriptions of these businesses on the conference website for your previewing pleasure. We are sure the 2017 ANWG Conference Market Hall will offer a fibre-filled shopping experience you’ll not soon forget!

Post by Brenda Nicolson


What’s Green About… Tencel?

Tencel is the brand name for a product made by Lenzing Fibers of Austria. The generic name for Tencel is lyocell. Only Lenzing Fibers makes Tencel, but several different manufacturers make lyocell. Lyocell is soft, very absorbent, resistant to wrinkles, and very strong even when wet. It can be compared to silk in its drape and shine. It can be both machine-washed and dry-cleaned. Because lyocell is so absorbent, it quickly wicks human perspiration away from the skin to the air, making it cool to wear. Lyocell naturally inhibits bacterial growth. Clinical studies have shown lyocell to be very good for people with sensitive skin or dermatitis.

Lyocell is a very sustainable fibre, made from regenerated wood cellulose. It is a vegan, non-petroleum based product. Lyocell fibre can be recycled and is biodegradable. Tencel is made from farmed eucalyptus trees without the use of irrigation or pesticides. They grow well on marginal agricultural land. According to Lenzing, it takes just half an acre to grow enough trees for a ton of Tencel fibre. Wood pulp for lyocell can also be sourced from beech and pine trees, which may require irrigation. Seacell is lyocell produced from seaweed, a very quick growing renewable resource.

Lyocell is technically a third-generation rayon. It is recognized as a rayon product in the Canadian Textile Labelling Regulations, but is considered a different fibre by the US Federal Trade Commission. Viscose rayon, which is often derived from bamboo, is a second generation rayon. Not only does lyocell have improved strength and luster over previous generations of rayon, but the process allows for close to 99% of the solvent to be recovered and recycled. This makes it a superior product in terms of its ecological footprint. The Lenzing plant uses about 154.7 gallons of water per pound of fiber to process the cellulose. The chemicals emitted from the plant are minimal and non-toxic.

Lyocell takes dye very well. Comparison tests found it takes one third less dye and only half the energy and other chemicals required to obtain the same colour as on cotton. This means that significantly fewer chemicals are used  to achieve brightly coloured yarns.

For fibre that has the smallest possible ecological footprint, look for lyocell fibre manufactured in Europe or the United States.

This Tencel cloth may not look green, but it is! Woven by Margaret Coe

This lustrous Tencel cloth may not look green… but it is!                              Woven by Marg Coe

 

The research for this article came from Lenzing.com, ecomall.com, organicclothing.blogs.com, wikipedia.org and nrdc.org

 Post by Christine Purse with Mindy Swamy


 

West Coast Natural Wonders – Guild Booths

So exciting that the guild booth applications are coming in and we can anticipate what each guild will bring and how much fun it will be to admire each one. The conference steering committee is providing $100 to the booth judged to best show our conference theme of “Treadle Lightly”.

We will also have awards for:

  • the best use of the conference colours
  • best display of guild booth items
  • best interpretation of the guild booth theme, “West Coast Natural Wonders”
  • best booth by a guild of fewer than 20 members
  • people’s choice

Judging will be by Carol Sabiston, a celebrated Canadian textile artist whose works can also be seen around town, including at the University of Victoria. You can see some of her work here.

Ribbons are already being woven in anticipation!

 

Post by Holly Vickers

A Call to the Guilds…

The 2017 ANWG Conference offers us a chance to enjoy fibre 24/7 for a few days, enjoy each other’s company, make new friends, and relish the wonderful work of guild members.

With this in mind – what would your guild like to do at the Conference? Besides guild booths – which will be fabulous to see – would you like to organize a challenge to other guilds? Are you interested in organizing an exchange (tea towels, anyone?). Would you like to demonstrate a method, pattern, fibre type? The sky’s the limit; we just need your enthusiasm, willingness and neat ideas.

If there is interest and I hear from you, we could start a guild ‘chat’ page wherein guilds could discuss challenges, toss around ideas for presenting to the Conference, or ask particular questions of other guilds regarding presentations at the Conference.

Please use my email address to contact me with ideas, requests, possibilities and for coordination of guild activities.

I look forward to hearing from you,

Prairie Escallier

Guild Liaison

guilds@anwgconference2017.com

Fashion Show Information

It’s time to start thinking about your entry for the Fashion Show at the ANWG Conference. You can look forward to seeing your piece on stage on Saturday July 1, 2017 and listening to the ooohs and ahhhs in the audience! Better than fireworks!

If you have entered before, you know what it’s all about, and if you haven’t, maybe this is the time to give it a try. Think about some of the work you’ve done recently or are planning and maybe a garment is the way to test out a technique, polish a proposal, or craft a creation! There are various award categories that you might qualify for – more information on that to follow.

In order to enter, you must be a member in good standing in an ANWG Guild, but you do not have to be attending the conference. Your item cannot have been previously shown at an ANWG event, although you can have displayed it at your local guild. All entries must be substantially handwoven, handfelted or woven, knit or crocheted with handspun, and have been completed within the last two years.

The deadline for submitting your proposed entry is April 1, 2017. Entry forms will be on the website shortly. The submission date is firm and your completed entry will need to be mailed shortly after. Start working on that fabric, that fibre, that idea now so that your entry is ready in good time. We are excited to see all the creative entries!

If you have questions, please contact the Fashion Show Committee at: Fashionshow@anwgconference2017.com

Post by Lee Valentine

Introducing Conference Keynote Speaker: Charllotte Kwon

Charllottee Kwon

Charllotte Kwon, owner of Maiwa Handprints and founder of the Maiwa Foundation, will be our keynote speaker at the ANWG 2017 conference.

Charllotte exemplifies our conference theme Treadle Lightly. She has an abiding interest in natural dyes and this focus has informed her path from surface design artisan to businesswoman to the creation of the Maiwa Foundation to an honorary doctorate.

She started travelling through Indonesia, Thailand, China and Japan researching the history and uses of natural dyes. Many of the recipes she learned had never been written down and were being lost as easier-to-use chemical dyes became available. Charllotte could not bear to see this happen and began to look for markets for naturally dyed products.

Charllotte established her business, Maiwa Handprints Ltd., in the late 1980’s on Granville Island, Vancouver. She worked to open up a market in Vancouver for handmade crafts, created with traditional skills and of a high quality workmanship. Her goal in her business was and is to partner with the artisans, using the growing commercial interest of western markets to support traditional skills and knowledge because it is only in this way that they will survive.

In 1997, Charllotte, through Maiwa Handprints Ltd., established the Maiwa Foundation. It is a private trust which has as its purpose “the reduction of poverty in rural villages by promoting the economic self-sufficiency of the artisans living in such villages”. The Maiwa Foundation works to save existing skills and knowledge and to help artisans regain former skills. Maiwa has become a repository of much knowledge about natural dyeing, weaving, embroidery, and block printing which it works to share widely.

In June 2014, Charllotte received an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of the Fraser Valley for her work empowering artisans from developing nations and for battling poverty by providing a market for their traditional crafts.

Charllotte works with groups and communities from Turkey to Morocco to India. She places great value on the importance of traditional skills and knowledge and works to create partnerships with artisans in many countries to preserve this knowledge.

Please visit the Maiwa Website to learn more about this remarkable business.

For those who like something to listen to while weaving or spinning, the Maiwa Podcasts are wonderful.

All registered attendees of the 2017 ANWG conference will have the opportunity to hear Charllotte speak.

Maiwa

Post by Christine Purse. Photos used with permission of Maiwa.